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News

Studio updates, current events, and archival posts from 2014-2017.

INTERFACE AND SOURCE CODE AT OUT OF SIGHT

INTERFACE is a next-generation light and space sculpture derived from the molecular shape of silicon. Floating on a MacBook Pro-inspired shipping pallet and encased in a massive hard drive from a lost Kubrick film, this work references both the occult dawn of our digital ecosystem and tech-noir future. Its geometric form and RGB spectrum invoke an astral, high-speed connection across our physical, digital, and spiritual states of existence.

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The people leading the research on these gases were glassblowers as well as scientists and chemists because they had all to make their own instruments,” Neuwirth said. “And all of this research in the late 1800s and early 1900s led to the first particle accelerator, lasers, cancer research, microchips — and it’s all space gas, man. This tube is all pure neon,” he said, lightly tapping the sculpture, “and this tube here is argon mixed with mercury.

SOURCE CODE is a multi-part series composed of transparent vacuum-sealed glass tubes containing helium, neon, argon, krypton, and xenon gasses under a high-power electric current. Every one of these elements has their unique property of illumination and form the building blocks of our entire digital ecosystem, from micro chip production to cancer research. Each separate radiating shape is attached to a custom-made aluminum frame that references from left to right: focus, energy, union, and transcendence.

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INTERFACE (neon, argon, glass, nickel, aluminum, silicon, two transformers, nylon, wood, enamel paint — 2015) and SOURCE CODE (helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, glass, copper, aluminum, silicon, eight transformers — 2015-present) are currently on exhibition in two separate locations at Out of Sight, a Pacific Northwest survey of contemporary art, from August 3-27. Quote taken from the Seattle Times, read more in the Seattle Weekly and Vanguard Seattle.